October Garden Share Collective.

Time to share the garden with other like-minded folk from the Garden Share Collective!

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September is always a busy time in the garden. As Adelaide tends to get extreme weather conditions in summer it is imperative all the vegetables we grow are well and truly established before summer hits. Therefore, a lot of planting has been happening here. We didn’t manage to find time in August to sow seeds so most of what we have planted have been seedlings from either Diggers or United Nurseries. We did buy a couple of hybrids from one of the big chemical companies, because we were running out of planting time. We have promised each other that next season we will be planting seeds no matter what and not buying hybrids ever again!

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We have had an abundance of flowers in the front garden.

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The roses are coming back after their winter prune.

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And the herb patch is looking gorgeous.

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We have planted one of the front fallow beds with tomatoes and basil.

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A few years ago we bought a single organic borage seedling from the Meadows Market. It self-seeded so we had lots of borage all over the backyard last year. Jamie transferred some of the plants to the front and now they are self seeding all over the front garden. I love the gorgeous blue edible flowers.

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We planted the other front fallow bed with leeks. This year we are experimenting using toilet rolls. Apparently, when placed over the leek seedling they encourage the leek to grow a thick white stem and it protects  them from bugs. It’s good to find a use for something that is usually tossed into the recycling bin.

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We gave up on the cabbages in the third bed. The weather was too warm for them and they were starting to bolt. They had a lot of caterpillar damage as well.

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We still have lots of English spinach and rainbow chard growing there. The pansies are coping with the warmer weather surprisingly well.

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Out the back the garden is looking lovely, due in part to the splashes of colour from all the flowers we planted to help attract more bees.

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It certainly seems to be working!

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On a sad note, we lost our remaining four Romanesco broccoli in one night to rats! They started on the snowpeas the next night so Jamie decided it was time for traps; he has caught six so far! We have never had this problem before so suspect they have been attracted by the chickens next door.

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The fennel continues to grow beautifully. I have been looking in to ways of preserving it. I am going to try both freezing and pickling – providing I get time.

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We now have a bed growing silverbeet, capsicums, eggplants and lettuce. An odd combination but it appears to be working. We intend sowing perpetual spinach between the eggplants and rocket between the capsicums.

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The snowpeas are finally bearing fruit.

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As are the broad beans.

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The cherry tomatoes are flowering already!

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We have zucchinis in one of the galvanised beds. The other is still being prepared for planting squash.

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And the comfrey self-seeded.

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Our sultana grape is coming back nicely. Hopefully, this year most of the grapes will be edible!

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With our new solar system we have continued to export more than we import which is great. To make sure we continue to do so we invested in some cheap solar bollards. Jamie puts them outside every morning and brings them inside in the evening to light thoroughfares that would normally need a light switched on as we walk through.

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At the end of the month we finally sowed some seeds – coneflower, yellow and black zucchinis, and more leeks.

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Rory doesn’t like being left down the side of the garden.

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At the Happy Patch Community Garden we have one plot growing watermelon and blackjack zucchinis. We plan on adding pumpkin, corn and bans in the next few days. The other plot has a mix of carrots, radish, capsicum, eggplant, spring onions, self-seeded lettuce, garlic, and tomatoes. We intend on adding cucumber to the mix. The place looks amazing at the moment.

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The home garden is looking pretty nice too 🙂

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Harvesting: English Spinach, perpetual spinach, silverbeet, rainbow chard, spring onions, radish, snowpeas, broad beans, lettuce, fennel.

To do: Plant zucchini, more perpetual spinach, rocket, bush beans at home. Pumpkin, squash, carrots, radish and cucumber at the patch. Plus general tidying up as always!

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I hope you are enjoying spring us much as we and our resident garden gnome Knarf are!

 

 

 

 

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About A Kailyard in Adelaide

A Kailyard in Adelaide! We are working hard to be domestically sustainable in the foothills of Adelaide. As we both work fulltime this is not an easy task, but we do our best growing much of our own produce in our yard and in our community garden plots. We reduce, recycle and reuse as much as possible and try hard to not consume mindlessly. We have 5000 l of rainwater, a 5 kw solar system, and use a green energy provider for all our excess needs. Rachel: Mother, partner, teacher, writer, reader, crafter, cook, gardener, artist. Jamie: Father, partner, lecturer, therapist, would-be-politician, gardener, photographer, music lover.
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12 Responses to October Garden Share Collective.

  1. Wow, you’ve got so much growing in your garden. i especially like your frilly white lavender and your petunias in boots. We gave up on our last cabbages and sprouts too and fed them to the chooks.

    • Rachel and Jamie says:

      I wish we had chooks but no more room! The frilly lavender is actually a pale pink, it’s really pretty. My favourite is the dark Avonview. I want another English and a green lavender to complete the herb patch.

  2. Sarah says:

    So many flowers… your garden looks lovely! I haven’t heard the toilet roll trick for growing leeks before – that’s one to try next year. Your painted plant labels are great too.

    • Rachel and Jamie says:

      Thanks 🙂 It’s the first year we have tried the toilet roll trick. I will be sure to update its success or failure.

  3. wow, you pack so much into your vegie garden. it’s so inspiring. i feel like such an underachiever compared to gardeners like you!
    i especially love that lavendar with the contrasting dark purple bottom and paler top. i’ll have to look out for one of those.
    ps RATS! yikes.

    • Rachel and Jamie says:

      So funny, that’s exactly how I feel when I look at your beautiful garden 🙂 I think the lavender you are referring to is a pink lavender. The photo is a little deceiving, it is not quite that dark on the bottom and the top is pinker. The other dark one is Avonview, my particular favourite. ps Rats are hideous!

  4. Oh my gosh….. I have garden envy! Your lavender is so pretty, and you can grow so much that would never grow here in the tropics. I got lost going through the list of what you grow – is there anything you dont grow? I absolutely enjoyed looking around your lovely garden, your hard work shows!

    • Rachel and Jamie says:

      Thanks so much 🙂 I love lavender, we have 7 but I want at least 2 more. There is plenty we don’t grow; I wish we had room for potatoes, sweet potatoes and okra for example. We only have 2 fruit trees and no space for more, we are considering getting a few miniature varieties to grow in wine barrels so they can sit on the driveway.

  5. Wow! Your garden looks terrific. Would you like to swap some of your fennel fennel for celery and 3 varieties of silver beet over a cuppa ??

  6. Rachel and Jamie says:

    Thanks Veronique 🙂 Funny you should mention catching up – Jamie is planning to send you an email this weekend suggesting a couple of dates for dinner!

  7. Lizzie says:

    What a clever idea using toilet rolls on the leeks. I usually just keep adding mulch. So much colour in your garden this spring. I think I am going to try and grow borage do you find it prefers shade?

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